PDSA Weekly Cat Q&A  

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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
17/11/2017 8:56 am  

Hi everyone,

We've signed up to receive copies of the Q&A session of the PDSA vet on a weekly basis now. I'll post cat relevant ones here. 🙂

Dear PDSA Vet, my vet has just told me that my cat has got roundworm eggs in his stools. He always uses his litter tray, but I am still concerned that my two small children might catch them. Can this happen? Shanti

Dear Shanti, Roundworms can be harmful to humans and particularly children, as well as pets. There is also another parasite possible in cat faeces called Toxoplasma, which has the potential to cause problems in humans. The most effective way to prevent roundworm infection is to use a safe and effective preventive worming treatment regularly as recommended by your vet. Aside from regular worming, hygiene is key. Adults who have contact with the cat litter tray should wash their hands afterwards and children should be kept away from litter trays and areas where cats toilet in the garden. As there are additional risks of Toxoplasma during pregnancy, pregnant women are also advised to wear gloves and an apron when dealing with their cat’s litter tray. 

PDSA is the UK’s leading vet charity. We’re on a mission to improve pet wellbeing through prevention, education and treatment. Funding from players of People’s Postcode Lottery helps us reach even more pet owners with vital advice and information. www.pdsa.org.uk


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Roseytoesrose
(@roseytoesrose)
Reputable Cat Moderator
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 313
22/11/2017 8:44 am  

This could be really informative. Thanks. 😀

Rose.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
07/12/2017 11:11 pm  

Here is the latest cat themed Q&A!

Dear PDSA Vet, My cat, Ryker, came in this morning limping and after checking him I found that the middle pad on his foot has a small scrape on it.  It seems a bit swollen and smells a bit.  Should I keep him indoors at night, even though he doesn’t like this? Rebecca

Dear Rebecca, You need to take Ryker to be checked by your vet, as the wound will need to be thoroughly cleaned and checked. The smell may also indicate that it is infected, so he may need to be prescribed antibiotics. In some cases, a cat will need to be sedated or anaesthetised for the wound to be properly cleaned. The vet will probably recommend that you keep Ryker indoors until he has healed. If he isn’t neutered already I would strongly recommend you ask your vet about this. This can reduce a male cat’s desire to roam and fight, as well as preventing unwanted litters.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
16/12/2017 8:56 pm  

Hi guys,

Just adding the latest PDSA Q&A:

Dear PDSA Vet, Socks, our long-haired tabby, has a seriously bad temper. He’s bitten and scratched my two young girls completely unprovoked, and even though they don’t go near him now he will run over to try and bite them. We can’t re-home him as nobody wants him. What should we do? Lauren

Dear Lauren, Illness or pain can be a cause of aggression in cats, so I would recommend you get Socks checked out by your vet, as there could be a long-term issue you are unaware of. If he has no underlying medical problems, then the problem could be due to what behaviourists refer to as ‘petting and biting syndrome’, when cats will initiate contact with people, but then will suddenly bite. Cats displaying this are often described as friendly but unpredictable, and there is a sudden change from accepting attention to reacting in a hostile way once they reach their tolerance threshold. Treatment involves raising this threshold, which your vet or a pet behaviourist will be able to advise how to do safely. Additionally, if your children do get injured by your cat it’s important to take them to see their doctor, as bacteria from cat bites can frequently cause serious infection. 


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
09/01/2018 2:40 pm  

Here is the latest cat column:

Dear PDSA Vet, we just rehomed a very timid rescue cat called Pixie. She is about 18 months old and was found on the streets with two kittens, so we don’t know if she has ever had a proper home. She lets us stroke her but won’t let us lift her up at all; how can we help her get used to this? Parminder

Dear Parminder, the key will be to take things very slowly. Pets are most likely to enjoy handling and human company if they have had gentle and kind contact with people from a young age. It sounds as though this is unlikely in Pixie’s case and this would explain her nervousness and reluctance to be lifted. You should offer her small bits of her favourite food (e.g. lean chicken) and let her approach you to take it. Then start stroking her at the same time. Once she’s happy with this, gently place your hand where you would to lift her (but don’t lift her yet), and let her take the food treat. When she’s relaxed with this, lift her off the ground slightly and put her down. Slowly build up like this, offering the food item and using an encouraging voice at each step. Don’t move on to the next step until she’s relaxed with the one before; this may take weeks or months. With patience, her confidence should grow over time. And remember to cut down her main meal slightly on the days that food treats are given. It is also possible she may never enjoy being picked up but she might enjoy other interactions with you such as playing or being fussed.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
06/02/2018 10:30 pm  

Here is the latest entry!

Dear PDSA vet, my daughter recently adopted a cat. He’s a bit nervous but loves being stroked if we allow him to approach us. However he’s recently started fouling beds and chairs, which might be because of stress. Can you help? Kathy

Dear Kathy, there is always a reason for a change in behaviour like this, so the first step is to find out the cause. There could be an underlying medical problem causing this. Your daughter needs to take the cat to her vet to check for any health problems. The vet can also advise on how to retrain him to use a litter tray. Sometimes, going to the toilet in unusual places can be caused by stress. Cats usually enjoy a routine and sometimes even minor changes, such as having guests to stay round, changing where the feeding bowl is or even re-decorating your home, can cause anxiety. If there is another cat in the house this could also be a factor. Cats are solitary animals and don’t always like the company of other felines, particularly if they are unrelated. Each cat in a household will need its own litter tray plus one extra, placed where one cat can’t stop the other cat from using it. They will also need their own beds in separate areas to help them feel more at ease.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
17/04/2018 2:27 pm  

Dear PDSA Vet

My cat has always had dry skin and she has a tendency to over-groom. But I’ve recently noticed that her skin has got really bad on her back, it’s sore and red, and she keeps twitching. What could be causing this?

Leon

Dear Leon,

Over-grooming can be caused by a skin problem or allergy so it’s best to visit the vet, who can prescribe something to reduce the itchiness and help the skin to heal. However, skin problems like over-grooming are often made worse by stress. Cats like consistency and any changes such as renovations, a new cat on the block or something as simple as lots of visitors could be stressful. If you have more than one cat, it’s important to make sure that there are enough sleeping areas, litter trays and food bowls (one per cat plus one extra).  A key cause of stress is territorial disputes over resources. Your vet can recommend ways to reduce her stress, if this is contributing to her over-grooming. Calming pheromone treatments may help some cats. For more info on stress in cats visit www.pdsa.org.uk/catstress.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
30/05/2018 8:24 am  

Now that we are back from Japan we will continue to post these here:

Dear PDSA Vet, my cat sometimes bites at a specific place on her back and rips her fur out, then licks or bites it until it bleeds. We put a cone on her head and it healed, but now she’s doing it all over again. I de-flea and worm her regularly so I don’t understand it. My vet says she is allergic to fleas. She doesn’t scratch anywhere else and she is an indoor cat too, is there anything else I can try? Tiana

 

Dear Tiana, it’s good that you visited your vet, as they are best placed to advise on what is best for your cat. A flea allergy is still possible even if your cat doesn’t go outside, as fleas and their eggs can hitch a ride on people too. Regular flea treatments, if used correctly, should kill any adult fleas that are living on your cat. You should also treat any other pets living in your home, so that fleas don’t jump from them back on to your cat. It’s important to know that your home harbours fleas too; eggs and larvae still remain in carpets, blankets and beds and can lay dormant for up to a year. It is important to treat your house as well, otherwise the problem will continue. Your vet can help you by suggesting a suitable house spray and regime of hoovering and washing.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
18/06/2018 8:27 am  

Latest cat entry in the FAQ!

My kitten keeps coughing and hacking, and then brings up what I think is a hairball. She does lick herself a lot, so I guess she’s swallowing a lot of hair when she does this. Is there anything I can do to prevent this? John 

Dear John

It does sound as though your kitten is bringing up hairballs. When she grooms her fur with her tongue, she’s also swallowing loose hairs and, over time, they bind together and ball up in her digestive system. Hairballs are much more common in long-haired kitties, but can still occur if your cat has shorter hair. The best prevention is to groom your kitten with a brush every day, which will help remove her loose hairs. There are also special pastes that can be given to help her pass a hair ball, though these don’t work for every cat. Getting a check-up from your vet would also be a good idea, to make sure she’s on right food to help prevent problems and to make sure there’s not a more sinister reason for her vomiting.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
04/07/2018 2:53 pm  

Dear PDSA Vet, my cat Missy always goes into my daughter’s room, either at night or early in the morning, sits on her pillow and eats her hair. Why? How can I get her to stop? Farah

Dear Farah, Missy is grooming with your daughter! Licking your hair means your cat is very bonded with you and wants you to know they’re you best friend. However, it can be annoying first thing in the morning! To stop this, your daughter will have to be very disciplined in not paying Missy any attention when she does this. With consistent ignoring, eventually Missy will learn she won’t get the attention she used to and will start to leave off until a more appropriate hour when she gets a good response. Cats are “crepuscular” – which means most active and ready to play at dusk and dawn – so making sure that Missy is fed and well-entertained before bedtime may help pause the early-morning kitty alarm clock. Cats often start their grooming routine as soon as they wake up, so make sure Missy has somewhere comfortable to sleep at night that is away from your daughter and keep her bedroom door closed overnight.


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Medran
(@medran)
Estimable Cat Admin
Joined:2 years  ago
Posts: 186
17/07/2018 2:28 pm  

Dear PDSA Vet, we give our cat Fluffball regular worming treatments, we’ve tried several types but nothing seems to work. It’s really embarrassing when friends come over and she wipes her bum on the carpet! What can they do? Marianne

Dear Marianne, It’s good that Fluffball has had regular worming treatment. However, Fluffball might be dragging her bottom along the carpet for a different reason. One condition that causes some animals to rub their bottoms on the floor is because of a problem with their anal glands, which are ‘scent glands’. They have two that are each about the size of a small pea and normally the contents are emptied naturally when a cat goes to the toilet, but sometimes they become blocked. This build-up is uncomfortable and causes itching. If left untreated this could even lead to an infection. As well as scooting, pets with an anal gland problem may also lick excessively around their bottom and dislike it if you touch near their tail. It isn’t quite as common for a cat to have anal gland issues as a dog so I’d suggest you make an appointment for Fluffball to see your vet to check exactly what the problem is. Your vet can help and also give advice about suitable wormers. 


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